Educating Architects

The Realities of Landscape

Educating Architects: How tomorrow’s practioners will learn today, a collection of essays edited by Professor Neil Spiller and Nic Clear is released in October. Ed has written an essay for the book which the publishers describe as ‘an anthology of essays by the world’s leading educators on how aspiring architects should be taught and trained’. Thanks to Neil and Nic for the invitation to contribute!

The abstract for the essay:

The Realities of Landscape: Landscape practices work with relations between people and their environments. They are a series of intricate and interwoven social, spatial and visual actions. As landscape architecture, this practice is informed by physical sites which are constituted by a convergence of processes. In the essay ‘Site Citations’, Elizabeth Meyer suggests that the design of sites has been ‘central to establishing landscape architecture as a discipline’. She claims that despite the associations that the practice has had with art, architecture, engineering and horticulture, it is the relentless engagement with sites throughout inventive design process that differentiates landscape architecture from other disciplines. By reading sites as social, ecological and spatial entities, landscape architecture has been able to develop beyond singular perspectives and static positions. It has evolved as a process of spatially interpreting these interrelations as site information and setting out dynamic interactions with the land. Landscape Architecture is evolving as a design practice essential to addressing both the everyday and the extraordinary circumstances of our environment and society.

Educating Architects